How To Be Taken Seriously as a Young Makeup Artist

I’ve had my business card thrown out in front of me. I’ve had salon/ spa owners laugh at me making it clear that they were not taking anything I said seriously simply because I was young. It’s true, I was 19 and new to it all. It is hard going to an industry where you have to prove yourself and people have decades more experiences than you, but everyone has to start somewhere. I toughed it out and now that I’m a bit older and have been doing it for longer I want to give advice to those who are starting out as young or younger than I was.

1. Do not cheapen yourself or let someone else do it. People will try to convince you that you should take less money because you are young, but keep in mind that there is a difference between young and inexperienced. Sometimes they overlap, you can be both young and inexperienced, or you could be young but have a lot of experience and talent. While there is something to be said about the amount training and years into something you have the more you can charge, if you have come up with your price and you confident with it do not settle for less. If you charge something at one place or with someone know that that number may follow you. Makeup artistry is a lot of word of mouth and you can’t have people comparing vastly different numbers in a short amount of time. It’s a fast way to lose customers and clients. Another reason this is bad is because you’ll get in the habit of changing your prices because someone older than you told you to. If they are telling you that you are overcharging because of a legitimate reason, then it might be good to listen and do your own research, but keep in mind that if people sense you are young they may try to pull a fast one.

2. Get experience, but not always for free. I’ve done a lot of free gigs, but sprinkle them in with paid gigs. You will be taken more seriously when you get paid for your service, it’s just the way it is. Another way to look at this is to get experience through training, go to free classes and take any free advice you can get, but sometimes it is good to invest in a class and pay for a certificate or class.

3. Team up with someone else. It’s good to get together with someone else who is new and combine your skills. It’s also good if you can have someone take you on like an apprentice. This will most likely increase your chances of getting projects and clients. Don’t feel like you always have to find another makeup artist, team up with a hairstylist or a photographer.

4. Observe what others do. Do other people utilize social media? Do they carry around a pocket hand sanitzer while they work? Check out little details and see if any of them work for you. It will save you time from having to figure everything out yourself.

Show up on time, be as professional as you can be and know what you can bring to the table no matter how old you are.

Advertisements

Eyelash Extensions: Worth it or Not?

In this post I’ll be talking about if eyelash extensions are worth it from the viewpoint of both the technician and client.

 

Technician: Recently I was trained in eyelash extensions. I had heard the amount of precision and patience it took, but I went in very eager to learn. It was tedious, there’s no doubt about that. You’ll also be working on the same person for up to two hours which could be a positive if you like to really get to know someone and spend a lot of time on one person, but if you like interacting with a lot of people throughout the day it you might find it boring. The people are laying down and usually provided with a blanket with their eyes closed so in a lot of cases they fall asleep, very similar to what happens when giving facials. You need full concentration on what you’re doing, I found it to be slightly more stressful than giving facials because let’s face it you’re holding pointy objects above someone’s eyes. You’ll gain experience quickly if you’re in a job where they only offer lashes. Everyone’s lashes are a little different. After some time you’ll begin to see the side of it where it is an art, where you can play with the angle that you flare lashes out or adding shorter lashes in between medium length lashes for more volume and really taking into consideration the person’s eye shape as well as their goals. Above anything else I can say is the beating your own eyes will take as they adjust to staring at something in such a close distance for hours at time. I experienced a lot of eye strain. I began wearing readers as I noticed all the girls I worked with either wore glasses or contacts. Going in I imagined the amount of patience required on an everyday basis becoming tiresome, but it turned out it was more physically taxing than anything.

Client: Although I did not get the extensions myself I did see the amount of care required to keep them clean and looking good. For the first 48 hours after you cannot get the lashes wet, so no heavy workouts and if you decide to shower you will need to wear goggles. It’s recommended you wash the lashes 2-3 times a day to keep any bacteria off them. Anything containing oil in makeup or makeup remover cannot be used. Something else important to know is that the lashes typically last for 2-4 weeks. It’s an investment on all fronts. I think some people really benefit from them and it can really change how you look. However for myself as I heard the amount of effort and time involved in getting them, I did think to myself that it wouldn’t be for me. I suppose it would become routine after some time, but if you have decent lashes or even semi-decent you’re best off with mascara and some false lashes.

 

For those that have eyelash extensions what has your experience been like?